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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 11:13 am 
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Body strips, or stripes?

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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:22 pm 
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typo in today's strip

It should be body stripes, not strips

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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:20 am 
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In today's strip, last panel, "is kinda is our fault" should have one less "is."

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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 4:03 pm 
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In panel 5 today, it should be "gun-toting" (single "T") instead of "gun-totting." (double "T")

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 Post Posted: Fri Feb 12, 2010 1:06 am 
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Actually, toting is correct, since Torg is carrying (toting) the gun.

Various on-line dictionaries wrote:
Totting:
Tot[1], v. t. [imp. & p. p. Totted; p. pr. & vb. n. Totting.] 1. To mark with the word "tot"; as, a totted debt. See Tot, n. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 2. [Cf. Total.] To add; to count; to make up the sum of; to total; -- often with up. [Colloq., Eng.]

Tot[2] n 1: a small amount (especially of a drink); "a tot of rum" 2: a young child [syn: toddler, yearling, bambino] v : determine the sum of; "Add all the people in this town to those of the neighboring town" syn: total, tot up, sum up, tote up, add together, add up] [also: totting, totted]

Toting:
Tote, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Toted; p. pr. & vb. n. Toting.] [Said to be of African origin.] To carry or bear; as, to tote a child over a stream; to tote a gun on one's hip; -- a colloquial word originating in the Southern States, and used there esp. by negroes, now common throughout the U. S. [1913 Webster +PJC]

--tll

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 Post Posted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 6:14 pm 
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Tormuse wrote:
In panel 5 today, it should be "gun-toting"
The Lost, Lurking wrote:
Actually, toting is correct
Actually, you're both wrong -- the word should be TOTING. ;)

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 Post Posted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 1:07 am 
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02/15/2010 next to the last panel, accept should be except.

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 Post Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:34 am 
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http://sluggy.com/comics/archives/daily/100223

First panel: 'You've go the ceiling...'

Should be: 'You've gotten the ceiling...' or 'You got the ceiling...'

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 Post Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:40 am 
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"A Homage to Kweepie" should be "An Homage to Kweepie".

Unless you're one of those weirdos who actually pronounces the "h" in "homage".

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 Post Posted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:11 pm 
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ZylonBane wrote:
"A Homage to Kweepie" should be "An Homage to Kweepie".

Unless you're one of those weirdos who actually pronounces the "h" in "homage".
"A Homage to Kweepie" should not be "An Homage to Kweepie".

Unless you're one of those snobs who doesn't pronounces the "h" in "homage".


Both are correct actually.

Though, the Compact Oxford English Dictionary says it's pronounced with an 'h'...

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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 12:18 pm 
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The OED is a dictionary of British English, not American English. Pete is American. The dominant pronunciation of "homage" in American English is with a silent H.

Besides, Google says "an homage" beats "a homage".

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 Post Posted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 10:24 pm 
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Yes, Pete is an American, and apparently he says it with an 'h' because that is how he wrote it as "A homage..."

Dominate? That is your opinion.

There is no possible way that Google can 'prove' the correct way. It is basically only a search engine that points to pages. Having more pages does not mean anything.


Either way of saying homage is correct.

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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 11:17 am 
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If it was written with an American audience in mind, it should be "an homage". ZylonBane is right about the dominant pronunciation of the word in the US. I know I have never heard it pronounced another way by an American. The basic rule most linguists agree on when choosing a/an is the deciding factor is what sound the following word begins with, not the actual letter. This is why I find it highly annoying when Americans pronouncing the h say "an history/historical/historian". Nobody talks about getting "an historectomy".

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 Post Posted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 8:59 pm 
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I know to use an "A" or an "AN" based upon the sound, not the letter. That is a basic linguistic rule you learn early in school.
s.i.l. wrote:
I know I have never heard it pronounced another way by an American.
That does not make it dominate. I have never heard it pronounced without the "H" by an American. So what I hear must be dominate then...

Most American dictionaries list both ways to say it /ˈhɒmɪdʒ, ˈɒm-/. Hence, both ways are correct.


This is going nowhere, and becoming very redundant. And it is not really the place for this. So...

Pete, it should not be "A Homage to Kweepie." It should be "A Tribute to Kweepie."

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 Post Posted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 11:42 am 
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Today-- "An interrogation squad with breathers are moving in." A squad is singular, so it should be "...is moving in."

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