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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 6:26 pm 
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(Oh God, Where's Malice when you need him? Ah well. You guys are stuck with me. Sorry. This is very much a DCAU Batman. I don't think I could do a Miller or a Nolan or even a Kane Batman justice.)

____________________________

Bruce Wayne is about to leave London after a failed attempt to secure some foreign investment to help bring Gotham city back from the brink. His failure to bring anything back does not sit well with him. None of the people he talked to seemed interested in investing at all, they merely questioned him about the Batman. Not directly, of course.

***

007 is briefed after the meeting with Wayne, and dispatched to Gotham.

***

In a private call with Alfred on his jet, Wayne discusses the failed meeting. Alfred gives him the usual, 'Your father would be proud, you can't fix Gotham single handed,' spiel.

Back in Gotham, Batman drops in on The Penguin at his club, The Iceberg Lounge, and pumps him for info on British crime bosses. The Penguin is not forthcoming. Shortly after Batman leaves, a brawl erupts in the Lounge.

Pengy's thugs drag in a fit man dressed in a tux. (The head Thug whispers that the man forfeited a loaded silenced pistol at the door.) The usual formalities occur. The Penguin immediately notices the accent, and having learned long ago to stop believing in coincidences where the Batman is concerned, asks his thugs to leave the room.

Penguin tries to ascertain who "Bond" works for. Bond does the same, in reverse. Sensing that his line of questioning is going no where, he offers Bond a job as an assistant. Bond seems tempted, but ultimately turns him down. The Penguin calls in his thugs, informs Bond that the donation of his weapon is appreciated, and asks for Bond to be escorted from the premises (politely).

Shortly after leaving the lounge, Bond is approached by a woman who tells him most pretty boys who go in to visit The Penguin don't come out looking so pretty. (I think you can figure out what happens from here...)

The next afternoon, Mia Sparra is relating the interesting information about her encounter with Bond to her boss, The Penguin. She tells him Bond fed her some sad sack story about the Batman killing his parents, and that he wants him dead. Both are perplexed by this, but for different reasons.

***

It turns out, it wasn't just Sparra who followed Bond out of the Iceberg Lounge. A man followed the happy couple, and booked a room at the same motel they did. The man follows Bond after he checked out. As dusk approaches, he puts on the act of a junky and begs Bond for change. When Bond is not forthcoming, he attacks. The man winds up dead, and Bond disappears into the night.

Sadly, a lone body in an alley doesn't really warrant much notice in Gotham City. Detective Bullock is just going through the motions. The vic had no money, no id. Drug deal gone wrong? Could be. The man certainly dressed down, but didn't have the other physical tell tale signs of an addict. Mob hit? A little more likely. Although, the apparent lack of guns or knives during the scuffle is odd. Not many hit men take the time to strangle a victim with their hands. Bullock tells the uniforms there's nothing he can do until positive ID can be made on the victim.

***

Bond's CIA contact is furious. Cleaning up an international incident is one thing. Cleaning up a cold-blooded killing? in Gotham City is another thing entirely. Bond, naturally, plays dumb. He corrects his contact, in that the killing was in self defense.

"See if you can convince him of that. You two would probably get along famously in any other circumstance. But you've killed a man. In his city. He's not going to kill you, but he will apprehend you." Bond is certainly not used to this kind of an ultimatum.

***

A few days later, Bullock and Commisioner Gordon are discussing Bullock's latest case.

"The prints match that of a known Gamboni associate, one Mike Tuff. That's all I got. I say good riddance, Commish."

Gordon thanks Bullock for his time, and dismisses him. Gordon finishes off the e-mail he was writing, gets up, closes the window to his office, and heads for home.

An hour later, Batman crashes through Gamboni's window.

"About time you got here, Bats!"

"Explain."

"One of my guys turned up dead. I'd like to know who's responsible."

"Like you don't know?"

"I have my guesses, but y'know, they say you're better at this kind of thing."

"I don't work for you."

"Believe me, I know..."

Gamboni finds himself pinned to the wall, a little short of air.

"What was he doing before he was killed?" Batman drops the crime boss, who falls to his knees.

Gamboni coughs, and sputters. "Christ almighty. He was keeping an eye on the Lounge, like usual."

Batman heads back toward the window. He turns and says, "It was either that, or a broken nose. Consider yourself lucky."

Batman and Alfred are having a chat back at the cave.

"Gamboni's been eying The Penguin's operation for months. If this was supposed to spark a turf war, it would have by now. Both bosses are playing dumb."

"Perhaps another chat with the Peng..."

"It hasn't even been a week since our last chat. I am not going to be their errand boy!"

"Of course, sir."

***

Bond is unusually frustrated. Everyone's afraid of crossing the Batman, except for him. That kind of attitude usually gets him face to face with whoever he's dealing with. Bond has already "killed in his city," what else is there? There's only one lead left to follow...

Bond jumps out of the taxi at Gotham Int'l, and right into the Limo.

"Mr. Bond, I presume?"

"Albert?!" Bond chides himself silently. Perhaps the martini wasn't such a good idea after all.

"No. Alfred, sir." The butler smiles.

The elevator ride to the top of Wayne Tower is long, But Bond doesn't care. The secretary doesn't even look up. "Mr. Wayne is expecting you sir." Bond adjusts his tie, and enters Wayne's office. The back of Wayne's chair is to Bond. It slowly comes around.

"Ah, Mr. Bond. We meet at last."

Several hours later, Bond emerges, and leaves Wayne Tower.

***

"A memo from 007 ma'am."

007 wrote:
The Batman is not the enemy.


"What is the body count?"

"One confirmed kill, ma'am. Perhaps he's learned restr-"

"I doubt it."

***

Gordon, and Bond's CIA contact are discussing the death of Mike Tuff. "We still don't have a perp," says Gordon.

"I understand your situation is unique, Commissoner, but you can't let one murder slide?"

"It's not that simple."

The agent nods, and leaves.

***

Gamboni is visibly trembling as he open's the envelope from the Batman.

Batman wrote:
Your man ran afoul of a Joker copy-cat.


***

Somewhere in a very heavily protected cell in Arkham Asylum, a man in a straight jacket laughs himself to sleep.

___________________________________

edit: I apologize for going straight to "dental identification." Bullock should have started with finger prints. That will require some more substantial editing. Maybe tomorrow?

Next up is... well shucks, I don't know. I assume GH is still working on ID4 vs. BSG?

POOF!
*Returns to Relative Obscurity as fast as he can*


Last edited by Dodger77 on Wed Mar 13, 2013 12:30 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:46 pm 
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Luckily for everyone, I know both BSG and ID4, so I'll break this match down. (Long Post Ahoy!)

(Also: when I saw the previous matchup, I immediately thought of this.)

First of all, let's talk about the competitors so everyone is on the same page. I used this, this, and this page for help with starship dimensions.

In ID4 a horde of alien locusts (almost said word-for-word in the film) show up to kill all of the humans on Earth and strip-mine the planet of all available resources. Their mothership is an ungodly large construct of ultra-dense metal and weaponry which has enough mass to cause the moon's orbit to be slightly perturbed. However, aside from being really big and menacing-looking, this really doesn't matter all that much (and its offensive capabilities, if any, aren't touched on in the film). Upon arriving, it releases one or two dozen 'Destroyers' which are immense, saucer-shaped craft roughly 24km in diameter. Each one of them serves the dual purpose of a battleship and an aircraft carrier. Their main armament is some sort of powerful plasma cannon mounted on the ventral side of the spacecraft, which is capable of devastating the cities which they hover over (in a surprising twist, the aliens in the film don't all go after American cities, although all of the movie focuses on America saving the day). They also have some sort of limited Anti-Air (AA) capability, as they shot down a pair of helicopters attempting to communicate with them with some sort of pulse-energy weapon. However, any anti-capital ship capabilities they have (if any) are not shown in the movie, for all-too-obvious reasons. The Destroyers are also home to vast numbers of saucer-like alien Attackers, each one armed with dual plasma cannons, and are highly maneuverable. Their weapons strength is enough to vaporize an F-18 fighter jet with a single shot, and they have some sort of explosive effect when striking harder targets. The aliens also have some sort of transport/frigate analogue which are only seen right at the end as they prepare to invade Earth properly, but their abilities are unknown, and for the purposes of this showdown, I won't take them into consideration.

Defensively (for their offense seems rather limited in scope, but not power) this is where things get tricky. Every single alien ship is protected by an energy bubble which can absorb tremendous amounts of damage. It is unknown just how strong they are, or if the strength varies between ships (ie: does a Destroyer have stronger shields than an Attacker? I'll assume that this holds true for this argument) The Attacker's shields are able to repel gunfire from enemy aircraft, as well as missiles and even midair collisions with the Navy jets. The Destroyer's shields are shown to repel multiple long-range airplane-mounted AMRAAM missiles, and managed to shrug off a cruise-missile mounted nuclear weapon (fired from a B-2 that was way too close to the stupid thing). However, the problem with this is that apparently the aliens have never had stupid teenagers of their species try to become hackers, because they have absolutely no grasp of the concept of a firewall. It was so bad that Jeff Goldblum was able to hack into the aliens' entire network and disable their defenses with a single, crappy Mac Laptop and a hastily-written virus (they didn't even bother to explain how in the *bleep* he could interface with their systems, much less write a compatible virus in such a short timespan). Once their shields are down, things get a bit more even. The Attackers are oddly fragile, despite their bulkiness compared to the F-18's they were dogfighting, and could be taken down by volleys of gunfire or a single missile. The Destroyers' armor is much thicker, and despite taking superficial damage from air-to-air missiles, it holds strong. The only vulnerability in the hull is their primary, city-killing weapon. When they opened it up and exposed it to gunfire in the movie, one of the pilots made a heroic sacrifice and kamikazed it. Apparently this causes the energy build up in the weapon to backfire tremendously, completely gutting the ship and destroying it. The mothership was destroyed in a Trojan Horse operation at the same time using one of the aliens' captured fighters and a tactical nuke detonated from the inside. Since the resulting explosion was far more massive than what the missile should have done (it utterly vaporized the truly monstrous ship), I'm guessing the nuke set off whatever power source they were using, which destroyed the ship.

Now for Battlestar Galactica. I'll take the fleet from mid to late season 2, when they (spoiler alert) acquire a second, newer Battlestar for the fleet, the Pegasus. Battlestars are what you get when you take a space-borne battleship and add on flight pods to convert it into a space/aircraft carrier. The specs on ship size are a bit iffy, but they are said to be 'flying cities', and the most reliable source I found pegs the Galactica at about 1.6 km (1 mile) and the Pegasus at a little larger than that. Battlestars -aside from their fighter compliments, which I'll get to in a second- are massive and powerful constructs, designed to fly into the thick of an engagement, disgorge their fighters, and stay put. Their inner pressure hulls are surrounded by large metallic ribs, on which is mounted ablative armor plating. The idea being that if the Cylons (bad guy robots rebelling against the humans) fired nukes or anti-ship missiles at them, the armor would catch and detonate the ordinance safely away from anything important. And it works; the Galactica, an older-model Battlestar, survives a direct hit from a nuclear missile during the Cylon invasion ("Brace for impact." "I haven't heard you say that in a long time.") Offensively, the Battlestars are armed with bow missile tubes, and are capable of carrying and firing nukes and conventional warheads. They also have a powerful "main battery" of forward-locked cannons (likely railguns) which are capable of decimating a Cylon Basestar (Cylon capital ship, more akin to an actual aircraft carrier than Battlestars; they are much more fragile) with a single volley. And finally, the Battlestar has a vast array of dorsally-mounted point defense cannons, fire-linked together. They are capable of laying down a sheet of gunfire to detonate incoming missiles and any Cylon Raiders (fighters) stupid enough to fly into the pattern. As for fighters, they come in two flavors; Vipers, which are fast, maneuverable, and seem to be armed with only twin machine guns; and Raptors, which are equivalent to modern-day helicopters. They are slower and less maneuverable, but they can carry more people and armament, including missiles, nukes, and guns. They also have somewhat heavier armor. In addition; the Battlestar Pegasus and her compliment are more advanced and more heavily armed than the titular Galactica.

The Battlestars are supported by a vast fleet of civilian ships called the Colonial Fleet (some of which are armed, as stated in a couple of episodes). They provide food, water, reactor fuel, and other amenities to the two capital ships, but this doesn't come into play much in this little wargame. On a final note for the Colonials: they have powerful computers, but all of them are physically isolated from one another, and their tech is relatively primitive compared to other Sci-Fi series (no directed energy weapons, no aliens, very little FTL, their soldiers are outfitted similarly to modern day soldiers). They stay primitive because their enemies, the Cylons, are advanced machines and if they networked their computers they'd be begging for the Cylons to try and break in with viruses (but at least the colonials actually have firewalls to begin with). The Cylons; hm, they come in two flavors: Centurions and 'Skin-Jobs'. Centurions are big, bulky metal behemoths, heavily armored and armed with integral submachine guns and claws (I'm presuming that they could operate other weaponry as well with their hands, but this was never shown in the series) Skin-Jobs are, well the closest thing you could call them would be Bio-Androids. They appear to be entirely human, except under deep medical scans which reveal them to be artificial in nature. They're just as delicate as normal humans, however they have a form of brain uploading; if they die within range of their 'Resurrection Network' or a 'Resurrection Ship' their memories are preserved, sent out through some sort of signal and downloaded into a new, cloned body, good as new. On the heavier side, Cylons have their Basestars, larger but more lightly armored than Battlestars, and are apparently only armed with missiles and their fighter compliments. They are controlled by humanoid Cylons engineered for the express purpose of plugging themselves into the ship and completely controlling it with their mind (they're also completely bonkers). Raiders, which are their answer to Vipers, and are similarly armed (twin machine guns). They have no pilots; instead Raiders are flown by an organic, genetically engineered brain. There are also Heavy Raiders, which are their version of Raptors. Additionally, every single Cylon ship is rigged for FTL, unlike the Colonials', of which only bigger ships and Raptors can go through FTL. (Their version of it is implied to be somewhat traumatic, as the Galactica is worn out by the end of the series and practically falling apart at the seams)

Alright, so now that everyone's on the same page, let's get the actual showdown. Allow me to set the stage. A-hem.

Earth's future is eclipsed. Hanging high above the blue-and-green sphere, like a giant man-of-war jellyfish in an orbit that carries it beyond the moon is the dark alien mothership. Massive, and seemingly impregnable, deep within its cavernous main bay dozens of alien controllers coordinate the planet-wide assault through the crumbling remains of the planet's own satellite network. They had been fortunate this time; the alien swarm had conquered many worlds in their long history, however most of them lacked any sort of higher intelligent life and this forced the aliens to deploy their own satellites to help coordinate their forces, slowing down their progress and requiring a greater expenditure of resources on their part to sustain the invasion. On the planet below, dozens of once-proud cities now lay blackened and crumbling from their Destroyers' weaponry, and the massive ships move in a coordinated and deliberate fashion, attacking their secondary targets around the globe. On their approach to Earth the aliens had identified key military and civilian targets as well as dense population centers and designated them as primary targets, the idea was to deliver a knockout one-two punch that would utterly break the humans' ability to counter-attack, and for the most part it had succeeded. To add insult to injury, their energy shields had held strong against the natives' scattered and disorganized retaliation, even their primitive nuclear weaponry hadn't penetrated their impermeable shields.

However, as all of their focus is on the planet below, and prepping their troops for a ground invasion, the aliens never notice the third group enter the fray until it's too late.

With an orange-blue flash the Colonial Fleet and its two attendant Battlestars jump into the system just beyond Luna. On the bridge of the Galactica Admiral Adama glances at his second in command, Colonel Tigh and requests a sit rep. Seconds later a droning alarm goes off and the lights flicker to red. One of the attendants speaks urgently into a comm as the DRADIS screen pings with dozens of anomalous contacts.

"Action stations, action stations. Set condition One throughout the fleet. I repeat: action stations, action stations, set condition one throughout the fleet. This is not a drill."

"What are we looking at, Saul?" Adama asks quietly, staring at the red blur covering half the DRADIS screen.

"Dammed if I know Bill." The balding, white-haired man replies quietly. "But what ever it is, it's big and it looks artificial."

"One hospitable planet, directly ahead of us!" A crewmember reports. "Lone natural moon, and... hundreds of artificial satellites, sir. This planet's definitely inhabited!"

"What about that big construct?" Adama replies. "Is it Cylon?"

"Negative sir, it isn't Cylon." The man replied. "I've never seen anything like it, the hull is made of some super-dense material that our DRADIS can't get through it. It's- it's at least 800 kilometers long." He finishes with a slight quaver in his voice

"By the gods, Bill." Saul whispers. "800 kilometers? That's impossible!"

Before anyone can react, there came a new alarm. "Additional contacts! Multiple inbound fighters, unknown classification!"

The alert fighters are scrambled, but soon something becomes apparent to the stunned colonials. Not only are the unknown vessels not of Cylon make, nor any other known design, but they are utilizing directed energy weapons, something thought impossible on such a scale, and certainly not capable of being powered by starfighter-grade power sources. Far more ominous are the increasing numbers of reports of 'green bubbles' surrounding the craft whenever the pilots manage to land a hit. These 'shields' as the pilots dub them are protecting the craft from all damage, although significant blows to the shield will knock the fighters back and off-course momentarily. However, the ships are still far more maneuverable than the Vipers. Even the heavy fire from the Galactica's point-defense batteries can't penetrate their shields. After many of the two Battlestars' fighters are destroyed, Admiral Adama orders a full retreat and once all fighters are aboard initiates a micro-jump out to the fourth planet of the system, a barren, red, lifeless body to learn more about this strange new planet.

Once there, their technicians begin analyzing the sporadic radio transmissions emanating from the planet and make a shocking discovery: not only are many of the transmissions in Caprican, but they refer to the planet under siege as Earth, the holy grail of the colonial fleet. Realizing that this is the homeworld that they'd been searching for for so long, and that fellow humans were fighting and dying to save it from vicious alien invaders, Admiral Adama orders a lone Raptor loaded up with a diplomatic team and sent to the planet to make contact with the human resistance and offer aid. Commander Lee Adama (the admiral's son) offers to represent the Colonial Military, while Laura Roslin (over numerous objections from all sectors) elects to go herself as President of the Twelve Colonies. Helo volunteers to fly the Raptor, but asks that Sharon (a Cylon defector who he's romantically involved with) comes with. When asked why, he replies that anywhere would be better than letting her stay aboard a ship where she's kept caged like a wild animal, and that he highly doubts that the people below would have the same prejudice against Cylons. When further questioned as to why they should let him do this, his response is that since they're dealing with an alien menace, perhaps a cyborg's perspective could be useful. And someone would have to explain the Cylon threat to the new humans; who better to do it than a Cylon?

Eventually, everything is agreed upon and the Raptor launches and jumps into Earth orbit on the far side from the mothership, descending towards an area of heavy radio traffic and military activity (Area 51). On it's way in, however, the ship is intercepted by two F-18 fighter jets. They attempt to explain the situation over the radio to the interceptors, but (predictably) no one buys it. Still, the president orders the Marine jets to close within visual range before engaging. When the pilots report that the Raptor "Isn't alien, but it ain't like any jet I've ever seen", the president decides to allow it to land, albeit under strict guard. The Raptor complies, and flies in low and slow, hovering over the tarmac on its jets, much to the shock of the military personnel (who know that such a thing is impossible with the avionics of the time). The Raptor lands and the passengers slowly disembark, and are treated to their first real sight of Earth: a sprawling desert with mountains in the background, a military base very close, and dozens of humans in camouflage pointing oddly familiar-looking assault rifles at them. They're taken into the base while a swarm of techs goes over every inch of the Raptor carefully, noting at how similar the technology is to theirs, however it's much more advanced and powerful. The colonials are given a full decontamination and are swept for weapons (Sharon is observed to be pregnant but the Earth humans don't have advanced enough medical tech to realize she isn't human herself). They are shown to the president and introduce themselves. The president is initially skeptical, but after receiving telemetry from the Hubble Space Telescope (which is intact seeing as the aliens have left all the satellites alone) they get a clear image of the massive colonial fleet in orbit around Mars, and realize that the newcomers are telling the truth.

Sharon helps to rig a radio uplink between the fleet and Area 51 while the Colonial President and Commander Adama explain their situation and background to the president, who is floored not only by the concept of humans living off of Earth, but of a race of sentient machines that not only hate humanity with a passion. A genocidal machine race who the colonials may have inadvertently led straight to Earth. Before he can begin to shout or rant, the worst possible thing happens, and a small Cylon fleet jumps into orbit around Earth-

-and is immediately engaged by the alien fighter combat patrol left in the area from when Galactica jumped in (what? I didn't say it would be the worst possible thing for the humans now, did I?). The Cylons, caught momentarily off-guard, are shredded by the aliens' advanced weaponry, and barely have enough time to send out a garbled distress call/warning before they are all atomized. Meanwhile, President Roslin manages to talk her Earthlong counterpart down.

Back on Earth, the humans from Earth successfully link up with the colonials and start discussing battle strategy, however the Earthlings are disheartened when they hear that the Colonials' weapons aren't able to penetrate the aliens' shields. The Earthlings briefly discuss the possibility of evacuating as many people to the Colonial Fleet as possible and leaving for a new solar system, but the idea is quickly shot down by the Colonials. They explain that the only habitable worlds that they know of are either Earth itself, or are under Cylon occupation, and that their fleet is stretched nearly to the limit as it is. Also, even if they fled from the aliens now, and against all odds found another world to settle on, the creatures might -and probably would- find them again someday, and they might be even more advanced then than they were now! They both agree that the only way to ensure their safety is to fight back.

It's at this point that David (the computer hacker guy played by the same actor who did Ian Malcolm from Jurassic Park) chimes in. He'd been listening to the colonials' explanation of their history and their war with the Cylons, particularly their counter-measures against Cylon computer viruses, when he has an epiphany. If he could somehow upload a virus to the mothership, one that caused all of their shields to drop on command, and distributed it through their battle-network, then they might have a fighting chance of winning. He brings up this theory, but it's immediately shot full of holes for logical reasons. "How would you interface with their systems, not to mention write a compatible virus?" "How could you make such a thing with such limited computer tech?" "How would you test the virus?" And most importantly: "what if the aliens have a firewall?"

However, Sharon interrupts and states that it could work, they'd just need to use Cylon virus software (which is far more flexible and adaptable than anything normal humans have cooked up) as well as rip the non-essential computers out of the Raptor to provide the necessary processing power to deliver the virus and batter down any cyber-defenses that the aliens might have. They could use the crashed alien fighter as a Trojan horse to dock with the mothership and upload the virus directly to their mainframe. When asked where they would get a Cylon computer virus, Sharon reveals her heritage and the fact that she could create such a virus if she had to. The Earthlings merely take this in stride ('enemy of my enemy' and 'beggars can't be choosers' sort of mentality). Sharon quickly asks the President of the United States for political asylum within the U.S. for herself, her child, and Helo if she agrees to help. Although the president doesn't like being backed into a corner, he readily agrees, much to the silent indignation of the other Colonials (but the relief of Sharon and Helo).

They soon get to work, and come up with a plan that after they'd deployed the virus, they'd set off a nuclear explosion within the mothership to disable it and prevent them from working on purging the virus. In order to get close, Sharon (when not typing furiously on a keyboard at a pace no human could ever match) works with the scientists that have been studying the alien craft to come up with a sort of 'crybaby' system. It's a simple, one shot communication that they'd play as they approached the mothership. It would manifest to the aliens as one of the crew from the original crashed saucer (they're all dead but the other aliens have no way of knowing that) calling for help. It would claim to have survived the crash and was kept prisoner by the humans for study and experimentation while its ship was rebuilt. When the actual invasion happened, it used the chaos to break free and reclaim its ship, although it was severely wounded and the craft damaged in the process. The transmission would cut off after this. Hopefully it would convince the aliens to allow them to dock.

With assistance from the Galactica and Pegasus comms systems, the American air forces coordinate with international forces and manage to get everyone combat ready just as a Destroyer begins approaching the base. Sharon goes up into space with Will Smith and David (refusing the so-called 'victory dance' cigar because of the baby, which leads to some awkward teasing from Will Smith's character to Helo about knocking up a robot, although the two form a sort of comradery quickly) Sharon and Helo are also at the pre-flight marriage between Will Smith and his girlfriend, clasping hands as the other two exchange vows.

As the insertion team flies away in the saucer, Lee Adama and Helo decide to take the diminished but still combat-capable Raptor into battle alongside the U.S. Air Forces, despite the tension between the two over Sharon's species. They lift off after the president gives his rousing speech, slightly modified to account for the Colonials' presence, and form up with the others. Meanwhile, the Trojan Horse maneuver works, the trio get inside the ship, sync up with their network, and upload the virus. Unlike in the movie, the Cylon virus takes effect immediately and every one of the aliens' shields drop. They give the 'go' code to their allies, and the battles begin.

The Colonial Fleet is sent to the nearby star system of Alpha Centauri, and the few armed civilian ships are designated as guards for the fleet. If Cylon ships appear they are to immediately retreat to one of five previously agreed-upon sites and wait for the Battlestars. Meanwhile, the Galactica and Pegasus jump into low Earth Orbit and disgorge their fighters. The majority of their fighter craft go towards bolstering the air forces of the humans on Earth, and only a few are left to help guard the ships in space. The alien fighters still in space attempt to Zerg Rush the two Battlestars (who are in close formation to provide overlapping fields of fire), thinking that their shields will protect them, and are abruptly blown away by the defensive fire from the warships' batteries of guns.

Meanwhile the air war on Earth plays out as it did in the film, except that their are minimal losses due to the more advanced Vipers and Raptors providing fire support. Russel still makes his heroic sacrifice by flying a missile up into the Destroyer's charging weapon, and he is honored as a hero. The two Battlestars finish cleaning the alien fighters out of the space around Earth -mostly due to the alien pilots' suicidal overconfidence- when two Destroyers begin rising from the planet below to engage them. The Battlestars fire their forward armament, but to their shock it doesn't cause quite as much damage as they thought it would. The aliens retaliate with directed energy salvos, which devastates the Battlestars' armor, but the ships remain mostly intact. In a last-ditch effort, the colonials launch nukes at the encroaching ships, blowing one in half and disabling the other.

Meanwhile, the Trojan Horse team is preparing to withdraw, when they find that they've been flanked by alien fighters and that they're locked into their dock by the suspicious aliens. Sharon reassures the other two that there's nothing to worry about, and she and David successfully override the locks on their ship, freeing them. They fire the nuclear missile and rush out of the alien ship as fast as they can. They outrun the explosion as the tactical nuke sets off the motherships' multiple energy cores, vaporizing the ship and devastating the dark side of the moon, for the alien ship was directly behind it at the time of its destruction. The Trojan Horse team manages to safely crash-land in the desert, and reports start coming in of the success of the joint Earthling-Colonial forces bringing down the aliens worldwide, with limited fire support from the two warships in orbit. The brave men and women who took part in the attack are honored with medals, and the Colonials' existence is finally made known to the shattered world at large.

There's significant culture shock, prejudice, racism, and some out-and-out battles as a result, but when the Colonial Fleet jumps back into Earth orbit, the Earthlings quickly realize that they didn't have much of a choice; much of the infrastructure to their society is gone, infrastructure that the colonial fleet still has in abundance. A trade soon emerges between the two disparate branches of humanity. The colonials provide excess materials and food to Earth while they slowly rebuilt their civilization, and the Earthlings gave the colonials land to settle on planetside. While not a perfect arrangement, it was the way things are after the end of the Invasion War. And while biologists, philosophers, and historians from both groups struggle to integrate their wildly different histories and beliefs, their military leaders grimly look out to the stars, wondering if and when the Cylons would arrive. Until Sharon Agathon, newly married, comes forward with the revelation that while hacking the aliens' systems she'd managed to get the schematics for their power sources, weapons systems, shields, and propulsion technology, which she ruthlessly barters into a life of luxury and safety for her family on the relatively untouched islands of Hawaii.

Admiral Adama and President Roslin eventually retire from their positions and make a quiet life for themselves on Earth, marrying one another after a long courtship. Although her cancer returns and she passes away not long afterwards, she dies happy; content in the knowledge that her people are safe. Commander Lee Adama eventually resigns from the military and goes into politics, although he never has much of a career. He eventually retires and lives off of the royalties everyone who played a major role in turning back the tide of the aliens earned, and lives comfortably in the Northeastern United States. Starbuck continues her career as a pilot instructor, until her Viper catches fire on the tarmac in a freak accident that claims her life. Gaius Baltar is committed to a psych ward not long after landing on Earth. He is later found dead in his cell, apparently strangled by his own hands.

Tom Zerek is arrested for domestic terrorism the moment he sets foot on Earth and stands trial before a combined tribunal of Colonial and Earthling representatives. He is found guilty and executed a short time later. Chief Tyrol and Cally eventually find love together and settle in England, having only a single child. They both decide that one is quite enough.

As for the Cylons, with humanity already in possession of a sizable industrial base in orbit -and not to mention having a strong motivation and sense of 'never again' in the wake of the devastating alien attack- they begin rapidly militarizing space, to the shock and protest of almost nobody. They introduced to the Colonials the idea of networking computers without using hackable wireless signals, and instead using hardlinks only, and keeping systems that have to communicate wirelessly (like comms) completely isolated from other systems. This renders humanity's newly-minted space frigates, destroyers, and orbital battlestations impervious to Cylon hacking attempts (short of them physically boarding and uploading the virus directly to the mainframe) So when a Cylon armada jumps into orbit several years later, they are swiftly cut down by a barrage of high-velocity gunfire and plasma. They keep trying, but over the years their attacks peter out as the Cylon race realizes that Earth isn't going to crack, and with an advanced form of the Cylon detection device being a mandatory security measure at every single spaceport, they realize that they would be able to bring Earth down like they did with the Twelve Colonies, and thus they retreat back across space. At least, until humanity finally looks their way again, with vengeance on their minds...

[OOG]
Whew! That was a doozy! So, what'd everyone think? Too long? Too wordy? Too off-base?
[/OOG]

drachefly wrote:
However that works out, it'll probably be more satisfying than the end of actual BSG. Haven't seen ID4, so I'll get onto the sidelines.


My personal theory regarding the endings; remember how at the beginning of the series when they did an FTL jump for the first time there were deleterious effects on the humans physically (nausea, puking, etc.)? I think that so many jumps over the course of the series addled their brains, somehow (possibly through radiation from the jumps interfering with neuron function in the brain). This resulted in hallucinations, strange dreams, and full-on psychotic breaks among many characters. As the time went on and more and more jumps were made, the humans (and skin-job Cylons too, since they had organic brains) slowly went insane from the side-effects, similar to Hyper-Rapture from Star Wars. This manifested as paranoia, delusions, strange dreams, and other conditions. Thus the ending of BSG wasn't actually about God having a plan that involved the Cylons butchering 80% or more of the Colonials' population, or the Final Five Cylons being semi-mystical beings or Starbuck being dead, it was about a group of people who had been trekking across space for so long that both they and their pursuers had gone completely mad, and eventually they settled on a world dubbed Earth and in their psychosis they sent their entire, advanced fleet into the sun. Over time the neurological conditions got worse, likely resulting in memory loss and other problems. They forgot their origins, their companions scattered across the globe, and regressed to a far more primitive state, until their descendants re-discovered everything they once had and built modern civilization. Bam, better ending or at least a justification for the Charlie Foxtrot that was the ending.

My crossover request: what if a Predator (from the film with Ahnuld in it) landed on the Pokemon World? How long would he/it last before something killed it?

Edited for Grammar.


Last edited by Galaxy Hunter on Wed Mar 13, 2013 4:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 2:26 am 
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Galaxy Hunter wrote:
[OOG]
Whew! That was a doozy! So, what'd everyone think? Too long? Too wordy? Too off-base?
[/OOG]


I enjoyed it! I assume this was the most recent BSG TV series, right? I skipped over your interpretation of the BSG series finale to avoid spoilers in case I ever sit down to watch the show...

I've got to fix a glaring error in my last post but I'm going to worry about that tomorrow.

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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 12:02 pm 
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Dodger77 wrote:
but, um, Star Trek vs. Star Wars?

POOF!
*Returns to Relative Obscurity as fast as he can*


NO NO NO, you cannot suggest SW vs ST and then poof away, this should be on the banned topic list. This discussion never ends well... NEVER. I move to strike this particular X vs Y from the record.

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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 12:17 pm 
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Jorodryn wrote:
Dodger77 wrote:
but, um, Star Trek vs. Star Wars?

POOF!
*Returns to Relative Obscurity as fast as he can*


NO NO NO, you cannot suggest SW vs ST and then poof away, this should be on the banned topic list. This discussion never ends well... NEVER. I move to strike this particular X vs Y from the record.

Objection sustained! The jury will disregard the Star Trek vs. Star Wars suggestion. The next match up is Predator vs. Pokemon.

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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 4:10 pm 
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Now Bat Man Vs. Iron Man, two billionaire scientists that love their various gadgets, that would be fun to watch someone do.

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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 5:47 pm 
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Jorodryn wrote:
Now Bat Man Vs. Iron Man, two billionaire scientists that love their various gadgets, that would be fun to watch someone do.


I'm starting to see a pattern (that I'm guilty of, too). When we pit two heroes, the stories end up with them resolving their differences and taking out some convenient villain. I think if this is to work as intended, we might need to focus more on hero of saga X vs villain of saga Y. For example, Thor vs Batman would be difficult to write without them teaming up. Now, Loki vs Batman, on the other hand...

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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 8:11 pm 
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Iron Man vs Batman video

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 Post subject: Re: X Versus Y
 Post Posted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 10:42 pm 
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Q vs Discord.

And no, I don't mean Q from James Bond.


Or, Lavos vs the Mycon, in lava wrestling.

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