Forum    Search    FAQ

Board index » Chat Forums » General Chat




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 71 posts ] 
 
Author Message
 Post Posted: Mon May 27, 2013 12:24 pm 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Tue May 21, 2002 12:00 am
Posts: 12031
Location: The things, they hurt
Plus it's no use to learn to say "where is the bathroom" if you won't understand the answer.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Mon May 27, 2013 8:56 pm 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 12:00 am
Posts: 2825
WLM: saenblt@hotmail.com
Location: Wishing I was not in Kansas anymore
I think knowing the words for various drugs would be useful. My lesson was learned by a trip to France. I needed something to sooth itching and was in an area where English wasn't known by everyone. That was an...interesting bit of miming at the drug store.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Tue May 28, 2013 1:25 pm 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Wed May 15, 2002 12:00 am
Posts: 10373
AlternateTorg wrote:
[*]Do you speak English?


I don't think it's actually at all necessary to be able to say this in any foreign language. You can ask the question in English; if the other person doesn't understand, then the answer is 'no'.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Tue May 28, 2013 6:08 pm 
Member of the Fraternal Order of the Emergency Pants
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2002 12:00 am
Posts: 3158
AOL: drachefly
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Then, "Can you get someone who speaks English?"

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Tue May 28, 2013 6:50 pm 
Member of the Fraternal Order of the Emergency Pants
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2003 12:00 am
Posts: 2993
"Do you speak English?" is short. "Get me someone who speaks English" is the obvious implied question if the answer is no.

Knowing how to say "please" is pretty useful. Aside from being courteous, it can be used as a crudely-worded request for help. Indicate an object in a store and say "please," and it's clear you wish to buy it. Tack it in front of the name of your hotel, and it's obvious that you're asking for directions.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Tue May 28, 2013 9:51 pm 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 6:07 am
Posts: 1490
WLM: sir_knighthawk@hotmail.com
Yahoo Messenger: sir_knighthawk@yahoo.com
Location: Out of my mind, back... never
AlternateTorg wrote:
"Do you speak English?" is short. "Get me someone who speaks English" is the obvious implied question if the answer is no.

Knowing how to say "please" is pretty useful. Aside from being courteous, it can be used as a crudely-worded request for help. Indicate an object in a store and say "please," and it's clear you wish to buy it. Tack it in front of the name of your hotel, and it's obvious that you're asking for directions.

Tack on what Heinlein said about knowing how to say thank you.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 2:09 am 
Offline
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 2:42 am
Posts: 1958
ICQ: 8854007
Yahoo Messenger: jorodryn
Location: Well since the universe exands infinitely in all directions, The center of the universe.
I can say thank you in a few languages.

There is

Domo Hairy Gecko.

Murky Buckets.

Donkey Shorts.

She She.

and Much Grassy Ass.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 2:12 am 
Gatekeeper of Niftiness
User avatar
Online
Joined: Sat Feb 09, 2008 12:16 am
Posts: 8151
Location: Praise be to the sticky elastic bands of the Healing Gauze
Seems about right.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 3:34 am 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Wed May 15, 2002 12:00 am
Posts: 10373
Quote:
"Do you speak English?" is short. "Get me someone who speaks English" is the obvious implied question if the answer is no.


Ah, right. That makes sense. Somehow, I'd missed that implication.

Quote:
Tack on what Heinlein said about knowing how to say thank you.


"Thank you" in Afrikaans is "Dankie", which is pronounced exactly like "Donkey".

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 4:39 am 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Sat May 25, 2002 12:00 am
Posts: 2341
Location: Smack bang in the middle of Europe
Jorodryn wrote:
Domo Hairy Gecko


I can figure out what the other languages you're going for are, but this one has left me baffled.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 10:07 am 
Member of the Fraternal Order of the Emergency Pants
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2003 12:00 am
Posts: 2993
I think what he's going for there is "domo arigato."

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 12:52 pm 
Offline
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 2:42 am
Posts: 1958
ICQ: 8854007
Yahoo Messenger: jorodryn
Location: Well since the universe exands infinitely in all directions, The center of the universe.
funny, I thought gato was cat.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 2:36 pm 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 12:00 am
Posts: 6868
AOL: RuanalHallen
Location: What matter wounds? For each time he falls, he shall rise again and woe to the wicked!
Gato is Spanish for cat. For instance, "Tengo un gato en mis pantalones." "I have a cat in my pants." (which was a hilarious day in Spanish class...)

Domo arigato is Japanese for 'Thanks a lot', with domo being 'much/very' and arigato being 'thanks'.

That said, when saying thank you in Japanese, more often you will be saying arigato gozaimasu (if in a more formal situation) or just arigato if among friends.

Domo - as in just saying 'domo' by itself is multi-use among native Japanese speakers, meaning (depending on context) 'thank you', 'excuse me', or 'sorry' to name a few. It's just one of those ways you use to acknowledge someone else. That said, it is very informal, and generally shouldn't be used unless among friends.

What really makes it difficult for non-native speakers to learn is learning to write in Japanese. Compare (assuming you have Japanese fonts on your computer, otherwise below may seem jibberish):

Romaji - Nihongo wo hanashimasuka? (Can you speak Japanese)
Hirogana - にほんごをはなしますか? Ni-ho-n-go-o-ha-na-shi-ma-su-ka-?
Katakana - カンヨウスペアクジャパネズ? (Might have gotten it wrong, but roughly 'Can you speak Japanese?' - katakana is used to spell out foreign words/names/phrases)
Kanji - 日本語を話しますか? (This is what you would normally see)

Romaji is generally only used by Western audiences who don't know how to read the other three, and basically involves spelling it out.
Hirogana is the simplest way to write Japanese, effectively having one hirogana per syllable. On a side note, if you were to see a person in a manga speaking entirely in hiragana, it generally implies they do not know Japanese very well (such as being a foreigner). Alternatively...
Katakana is how the Japanese write most foreign words or names. If you see someone in manga speaking in katakana, they're likely speaking in a foreign language (often English). It is also used for sound effects in manga.
Kanji, however, is the tricky part. They're the most complex characters, and, based on the situation in which they are combined together, may have completely different meanings. For instance, 夢 means dream, and 中 means inside, but if you put them together with 夢中 it can mean daze/trance/delirious - literally dreaming inside.

And then you start stacking formal vs. informal wording on top of that, the use of honorifics like -san/-sama/-sempai ect., always referring to someone by their last name (calling a Japanese person by their first name, without any honorifics at all, is very rude - that form of address is reserved for very close friends or loved ones)... and the sheer amounts of contextual layered meaning that tends to come across with it...

Gah. Yeah. It's definitely an interesting language to learn.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Thu May 30, 2013 4:58 pm 
Offline
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 2:42 am
Posts: 1958
ICQ: 8854007
Yahoo Messenger: jorodryn
Location: Well since the universe exands infinitely in all directions, The center of the universe.
I lived on Okinawa for 4 years and learned a bit of the language. I made the gato comment to be funny, but I do appreciate the lesson.

Top 
   
 Post Posted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 6:43 pm 
User avatar
Offline
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 12:00 am
Posts: 2825
WLM: saenblt@hotmail.com
Location: Wishing I was not in Kansas anymore
I have that feeling I always get right before a major move - excited, sad and filled with dread. Excited because I look forward to leaving Wichita for a bigger, more interesting city. Sad that I'm leaving all of the wonderful people I met behind. Filled with dread that I'll actually hate everything about my newest hometown.

And of course, it makes me remember everyone I've ever moved away from. I've been a nomad all my life, and now that I'm approaching 30, I'm slowly realizing that I want to find a permanent residence - or at least a place I'd consider as home with no foreseeable plans of moving.

Top 
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 71 posts ] 

Board index » Chat Forums » General Chat


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: